The song, “Riders on the Storm,” recorded in 1971 by the Doors invaded my mind this morning.  Perhaps I’m the only person in the US who can’t remember ever hearing this song.

My curiosity peaked by the title, I had to look up the lyrics.  Like many songs, some of the lyrics didn’t make sense to me.  However, the chorus is stunningly applicable to what happened a year ago.

Riders on the storm
Riders on the storm
Into this house we’re born
Into this world we’re thrown
Like a dog without a bone
An actor out alone
Riders on the storm

There is such amazing hope and despair coupled in these lyrics that my imagination was captured.  The songwriter says, we are riders on the storm.  Not tossed or turned in the storm but caught up riding above the storms of life.  However, once the hope is given, there is great despair because we are born to be thrown alone and lost.

One year ago today, my husband fell and broke his hip and leg.  He came home from an extended stay in the hospital and rehab centers on February 14, 2011 and died May 10.  I was only 10 feet from him when he fell; but we were in different rooms.  I bust through the door to find him sitting on the shower floor writhing in pain.  I knew he had broken his hip.  My first thoughts were our lives just radically changed.  Nevertheless, I had no idea how much change had stolen through our doorway.

From that moment, together he and I became riders on the storm, embracing and repelling the future with all our strength.  We laughed and cried in the same breath.  As his dementia accelerated, each moment became a bitter/sweet memory that I knew he would forget as soon as the hour passed.  I felt bitterly alone; yet surprisingly embraced second by second by Frank, our family and friends.  God’s wisdom was clearly working in our lives while the mystery of tomorrow became more and more clouded.

Often, God uses the secular to teach us His truths.  Today, I’m grateful to the Doors for their prophetic recording.  I ask God to bless them abundantly by leading them to know him through His Son, Jesus their Savior and Lord.

What about you?  Has there be one song–perhaps even a secular song–that God has used to help you through difficult circumstances?  Would you ever be able to use this teaching with your members who are mentally challenged?  How would you share this teaching?

 

Family Cafe logo

Dear Friends,

It’s official, the 2014 Florida Legislative Session has begun! Our elected representatives will be in session until May 2nd, working on a state budget, and tackling issues like Medicaid expansion, changes to the education system and efforts to reduce waitlists for state services.

While all sessions are political, the practice of the politics of the 2014 Session will be intensified, as the Governor, the entire Cabinet, all 120 members of the House, and half of the Senate (20 members) are up for election in November. So, this is the perfect time for advocates in the community to get involved. Let’s talk . . . let’s get informed and let’s get engaged!

 


 

Let’s talk . . . The Family Café is built around the idea that better informed families make better decisions for themselves and their loved ones.

Let’s talk . . . During the 2014 Regular Legislative Session, which beganTuesday, March 4, 2014 and lasts for 60 days, The Family Cafe is providing an opportunity to meet weekly via conference call to discuss the outcomes of Session. Please call in!

Let’s talk . . . During the conference call we will host various speakers, including community leaders, legislative leadership and local activists to share ideas/comments regarding the agencies and programs funded by the state.

Let’s talk . . . This is your call!  We will offer this conference call option every Friday for starting Friday, March 14th  at 4:00 p.m. The call is open to everyone! 

Let’s talk . . . Our  vision of meaningful family engagement in the legislative process can only be successful with the your participation!  Simply call the number below on Friday afternoon at 4:00 p.m. (EST). Sharing our various, unique perspectives is how we effect change, and how we learn from each other. At such a crucial time, we need to concentrate our strength, power and wisdom in order to insure an improved quality of life for all Floridians. Your input, suggestions and sharing of resources will ultimately make this community as powerful and productive as it should be.

But we can’t do it without you!

Let’s Talk!

Friday, March 14th

4:00 p.m. EST

Dial-in Number:  1-888-670-3525 

 Conference Code 2424632211 followed by the # Key.

Family Cafe logo

Dear Friend,

The Family Café is excited to let you know that NFL legend and disability advocate Dan Marino will be in attendance at The 16thAnnual Family Caféthis June!

Dan MarinoOf course, Dan Marino is best known for the seventeen seasons he spent as quarterback of the Miami Dolphins, which led to him being inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005. But did you know that he is also the parent of a child with autism, and an active disability advocate? He and his wife founded The Dan Marino Foundation in 1992 to help children with autism and other disabilities. Since then, the foundation has distributed over $22 million to research, services, and treatment programs. His foundation also established The Dan Marino Center at Miami Children’s Hospital in 1995, and recently launched the Marino Campus in Fort Lauderdale to provide education and training to help young people with disabilities acquire job skills.

Marino Children's centerThe Family Café is pleased to let you know that Dan Marino will be on hand to share his advocacy message, and perhaps some NFL memories, at The Annual Summit on Disabilities on the evening of Friday, June 6th. Governor Rick Scott has also committed to attend, as has long-time Family Café supporter and Education Appropriations Subcommittee Chair Bill Galvano. This year’s Summit is sure to be a memorable occasion, and we definitely want to see you there!

If you haven’t already registered for The 16th Annual Family Café, why not take a minute to do it today? In addition to The Annual Summit on Disabilities with Dan Marino, we have a full slate of informative breakout sessions, a full Exhibit Hall and plenty of family-friendly activities in store. It should be an amazing event!

The 16th Annual Family Café is set for June 6-8 at the Hilton Orlando, and there is no cost for families to attend. We even have limited financial assistance available to cover the cost of on-site accommodations. To register, visit our website. We will look forward to seeing you there!

Thanks,

The Family Cafe

The Family Cafe 888-309-CAFE www.FamilyCafe.net

519 North Gadsden Street
Tallahassee, FL 32301
United States

noah's arkThe Villages at Noah’s Landing has been recommended to receive a $14 Million dollar grant in order to begin construction.  Noah’s Landing is an awesome, pedestrian-oriented lifestyle community that will feature unique apartment-styled homes with a clubhouse, daily activities, pool, nature trails, a community park, and an optional dining room. We are working on the mountain of paperwork that is needed to finalize the grant and we have been asked to provide a list of people that may be interested in moving into our community.

So we need your immediate help!  Please log on to the following link and complete the survey:http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/NLInterest

This will only take 10 to 15 minutes to complete but the information is essential to keep our grant funding moving forward.  Even if you have previously completed a similar survey, please complete the survey again, this is very important.

This survey is not an application for The Villages at Noah’s Landing.  However, the people that complete the survey will be among the first to be notified when applications are being accepted. If you have any questions please call our office at (863) 815-0909

Visit our website at:  NoahsArkFlorida.org

Jack Kosik – Executive Director of Noah’s Ark

If you would like to read the recent Lakeland Ledger article on our grant, go to the following link:

http://www.theledger.com/article/20131214/NEWS/131219602/0/SEARCH

Justina-pelletier_2Justina-pelletier_2Perhaps you have heard or read about a young woman named Justina Pelletier.  She is still a teenager. She is not intellectually disabled though the young woman was diagnosed in 2011 with mitochondrial disease.  This is a disease in which the mitochondria (the energy-producing organelle in cells) does not function properly.  The symptoms of the disease include pain, fatigue and gastrointestinal issues.

Through a complicated series of events, Ms. Pelletier became a ward of the State of Massachusetts primarily because of a clause in the Boston Children’s Hospitals Policies and Procedures.

The hospital’s clinical investigations policy states (emphasis added):

Children who are Wards of the state may be included in research that presents greater than minimal risk with no prospect of direct benefit (46.406 (50.53) or 46.407 ( 50.54) only if the [institutional review board] determines and documents that such research is

Related to their status as wards; or

Conducted in schools, camps, hospital, institutions, or similar settings in which the majority of children involved as participant.

Pelletier_1While no charges of neglect have ever been charged against Jennifer’s parents, after she was transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital, she became a ward of the State of Massachusetts.  The parents no longer have any say in her treatment or where she is placed.  The parents do not know if she is part of any research projects.  For a time, they were not given visitation rights.

Jennifer was taken off of her medications.  When the parents saw her decline after being taken off the meds, the parents asked that she be put back on the medications that were helping her.  They reported that they were told that if they put Jennifer back on her medication, they would be charged with child abuse for giving her an excess of drugs.

In a meeting in October of 2013, ministry leaders from all over the country and Canada came for a day to sharing and prayer.  To a person, every leader came with one concern. What is going to happen to the people within the mentally challenged community when financial collapse happens in the US? Our members are financially and professionally tied to the state and federal governments.

I’ve never been  a prophet of despair.  However, this was a warning signal that even I could not ignore.  It may be time to prepare for the future of our friends and members who are intellectually disabled by storing up massive containers of prayer in the deposits of heaven.  The promises of God are that he will help the weak and take care of the wounded.  However, even recent history tells us that this vulnerable population has been a prime target for abuse.

The Lord uses men and women to do his work here on earth.  We are his hands and feet.  We need godly wisdom to know what our part will be in the future; and what our action should be today.

Minimum Wage Executive Order to Include People with Disabilities

white house signingWashington, DC (February 12, 2014) – Today, the White House announced that President Barack Obama will sign an Executive Order raising the minimum wage to $10.10 for all future federal contract workers, including workers with disabilities.

This Covers individuals with disabilities.  Under current law, workers whose productivity is affected because of their disabilities may be paid less than the wage paid to others doing the same job under certain specialized certificate programs. Under this Executive Order, all individuals working under service or concessions contracts with the federal government will be covered by the same $10.10 per hour minimum wage protections.

By including people with disabilities in his Executive Order, the President has opened the doors of equal opportunity to many federally contracted employees with disabilities.

partyYesterday, I found myself “stuck” at a party I had not wanted to attend.  As part of our ministry, we escort our members to afternoon socials that are held by our county recreation department for people with special needs.  One parent asked me to take her daughter from our program to the social.

I was concerned because this member needs constant supervision.  I explained to the mom that my Sunday mornings begin before 7:00AM; and I did not plan to stay at the party which ended at 4PM.  I was assured that the parent would meet me at the party as soon as I got there.  It was two hours later before a parent arrived.

another partyI confess there was plenty of good conversation to keep me entertained.  However, I stewed about the two-hour delay in his arrival.

This morning I received an email which contained a teaching about God’s grace by Hector Perez of MarketPlace Ministries.  I wish I had read this before I spent the afternoon trying not to be miserable.  Yet, failing.

Perez suggests five practical ways you and I can demonstrate grace no matter what situation we find ourselves:

  1. Pray for a humble and contrite heart.
  2. Get rid of having a judgmental spirit.
  3. Esteem others better than myself.
  4. Avoid comparing myself to others.
  5. Embrace God’s grace every day.

We know that grace is unmerited favor.  We also know that God wants us to demonstrate His unmerited favor no matter what the situation.  These steps are simple enough that even I could access them into my life.

bulliesFighting Fair

The Philistine also said, “Today I stand and make fun of the army of Israel! Let me have one of your men to fight!”  I Sam 17:10

Introduction–A few years ago, two young men tried to steal my purse from me by grabbing it and driving off in their car.  They weren’t able to get my purse or really hurt me.  You see, even through they were driving a Honda and there were two of them and only one of me, it was not a fair fight because God was on my side.  As we look at the story of David and Goliath, I want us to think about what makes a fair fight.  Have a member read I Samuel 17:10.

  1.  The story of David and Goliath.  Goliath was taunting the Army of Israel and making fun of them.  He said to send one man to fight.  (I Samuel 17)
    1. What Goliath didn’t know was that this was not a fair fight.
    2. He thought he had the advantage but God had the advantage
    3. God sent David to the camp to be able to fight Goliath and to win.
    4. What we need to understand is that God wants us to win every battle and to have the victory everytime and in every way.
  1. God gives victory to his children because he loves us.
  2. Last week we had a funeral for my brother-in-law and it was sad but wonderful because we were able to spend time together and be with the family that does not know Jesus as their Savior and we saw the young people ministering to each other.
  3. Have you ever been in a problem and seen God turn that problem around for your good?
  1. I have a person in my life that has tried to hurt me and my family.  This person has only made us stronger people.
  2. I had a person one time who wanted to really hurt me; and for a while it seemed to work. Then in my hurt, I found SpG and God gave me all you folks to love me and for me to love.

Conclusion:   God doesn’t fight fair when it comes to his children.  There will be people who will try to hurt you; but they cannot because God is on your side and he always gives us victory.

Family Cafe logo

Dear Friend,

It’s almost time to register online for The Family Café’s “Sweet Sixteen,” The 16th Annual Family Cafe!

Online registration for The 16th Annual Family Café will open on another sweet occasion, Valentine’s Day, Friday, February 14th at 9:00 AM (EST). At that time, you will be able to visitwww.FamilyCafe.net to register. As part of the registration process, you will also be able to request Financial Assistance to cover the cost of your hotel stay at the Hilton Orlando, host site for The 16th Annual Family Café.

A PDF version of the registration brochure is available on our website right now. It can be viewed by following this link. Feel free to download the brochure and share it with other families in your community! If you wish to send in your registration form immediately instead of waiting until February 14th to register online, you can fax it to us at 850/224-4674 or mail it to The Family Cafe at 519 N Gadsden St., Tallahassee FL 32301.

Remember, Financial Assistance will be distributed through a lottery process. Whether you register online, by fax, or by mail, your chances of receiving Financial Assistance remain the same.

Also, if you register by mail or fax, there is no need to register again online after the online registration form becomes available.

The Family Café’s Sweet Sixteen will be held June 6-8, 2014 at the Hilton Orlando, 6001 Destination Parkway in Orlando.  A block of rooms has been reserved at a special conference rate of $109 per night.  To make a reservation, call the Hilton at 407/313-4300. Make sure to mention The Family Café to get the special room rate.

No matter how you register, please remember to mark your calendar for The 16th Annual Cafe! It should be a fantastic Sweet Sixteen weekend with much to offer you and your family. If you have any questions about the event or the registration process, feel free to contact us at 888-309-2233(CAFE) or by replying to this message. Otherwise, we will look forward to seeing you in June!

Thanks,

The Family Cafe

The Family Cafe 888-309-CAFE www.FamilyCafe.net

519 North Gadsden Street
Tallahassee, FL 32301
United States


AAIDD Colleagues:

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) seeks applicants for the position of Editor of its peer-reviewed journal, American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AJIDD), for a term of four years that shall begin in mid-2014 and with the first issue under the direction of this Editor to be January 2015.

About AJIDD

First published in 1896, AJIDD is among the top-ranked, peer-reviewed, multidisciplinary publications reporting current and critical research in the biological, behavioral, and educational sciences. AJIDD contains high-quality, original contributions to the literature on intellectual disability, its causes, treatment, and prevention. AAIDD publishes the journal bimonthly (January, March, May, July, September, and November).

AJIDD is distinct from AAIDD’s other multidisciplinary peer-reviewed journals, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD) and Inclusion. IDD focuses on the application of emerging policies, innovative practices, and transformative concepts, and Inclusion presents and discusses evidence-based interventions and strategies that promote the full inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in society.

Qualifications and Responsibilities 

Qualifications for the position are an established record of scholarship in the disabilities field, managerial skills necessary to oversee the editorial cycle, and the ability to attract and retain respected experts to the editorial advisory board.

The major responsibilities of the Editor of AJIDD include:

•    Overseeing the peer review of approximately 100 manuscripts per year;
•    Soliciting high-quality manuscripts from potential authors, deciding which manuscripts to publish, and assisting authors advance their manuscripts to publication;
•    Selecting a sufficient pool of competent reviewers to reach conclusions and make decisions on manuscripts in a timely fashion;
•    Identifying and appointing qualified members to an editorial advisory board; and
•    Providing a clear vision for the direction of the Journal.

Applicants must have clear employer or institutional support for this activity for the duration of their appointment, including release time and general office support. AAIDD does not pay for office space or release time, but can provide basic financial support for the IDD Editor, which may include funds for clerical assistance, office supplies, postage, and telephone beyond what will be provided by the Editor’s home institution. Since the support offered by different institutions varies widely, interested individuals are encouraged to contact the appropriate office of their employer in order to ensure the feasibility of your application.

Application Process 

Interested individuals should prepare and submit an application via email. The application must include:

•    Letter of Application that describes your qualifications for the role of Editor of IDD, such as past experience as an editor or member of an editorial team, history of scholarship in the field, and demonstrated capacity to manage deadlines and to attract and retain contributors to projects.
•    Vision Statement that provides a clear description of your vision for IDD under your leadership. Set forth your goals and plans for the content of the Journal, with an assessment of the current strengths, weaknesses, or gaps that you plan to address and how you will operationalize your plan.
•    Vita or Resume that accurately portrays your experience, indicates your current affiliations, and lists your current contact information.
•    Evidence of Institutional Support, which may be a letter of support or other documentation from your employer that describes the level of support (release time and general office support) available should you be selected for the position.

Applications will be reviewed by the Search Committee immediately after the submission deadline. Interviews will be conducted by phone and the selected candidate will be expected to disclose any potential conflicts of interest prior to appointment and annually thereafter throughout his or her term of service.

Applications will be accepted via email only. Send application packets to Margaret Nygren, EdD, Executive Director, at mnygren@aaidd.org by December 13, 2013.

Marc J. Tasse, PhD, FAAIDD
Chair, AJIDD Editor Search Committee

megan wall

Megan Wall, esq

Summary of the iBudget Rule Challenge Final Hearing before DOAH
7/9/13-7/11/13

Earlier this month, I attended the three day rule challenge hearing before the Division of Administrative Hearings (“DOAH), at which Holland & Knight attorneys Gigi Rollini, Karen Walker and Matthew Mears represented developmentally disabled consumers challenging the third version of proposed rules to implement the iBudget.  Like so many other consumers receiving services through Florida’s Developmentally Disability Services Waiver, all four Petitioners received significant proposed reductions under the iBudget further depleting their already inadequate funding.  Because this case impacts every Waiver consumer, I am summarizing what occurred for those who could not attend.

In response to the rule challenge, APD hired five private attorneys, in addition to two in-house lawyers. The team of seven lawyers had significant resources at their disposal to defend the rule.

In Florida, rule challenges are fast track cases meant to be heard within 30 days from the filing of the petition.  This hearing was scheduled the very first full week in July. The Holland & Knight lawyers fought hard (and succeeded) against APD’s attempts to delay the hearing. While it is difficult to go to a full-scale hearing so quickly, the Holland & Knight team was concerned that to give APD more time to prepare would drive up the expense of the case. Amazingly, despite the holiday weekend, the hearing began as originally scheduled, which was difficult but strategically important.

The case at its core is simple. The iBudget statute directs APD to set each client’s funding for services at an amount based on a statistically valid algorithm, and then consider if the person needs an increase to that amount because of extraordinary, one-time, temporary or changed needs.  Florida law prohibits APD from enacting rules that run contrary to, or expand the implementing statute. Despite these legal limitations, the evidence in the case showed that:

1.         APD used the algorithm only as a starting point for setting funding because, in APD’s own words, the algorithm APD designed produced “harsh results” for many. Because the algorithm does not result in an equitable allocation of the funds for DD waiver clients, APD created an elaborate and subjective “methodology” to decide whether or not to use the algorithm to set a client’s iBudget. This supplemental “methodology” treats some groups of people differently, even where clients in those groups have the exact same needs.  Most glaringly, APD’s “methodology” targets existing DD waiver clients and singles them out to receive lower budgets than a new client with identical needs. Given that the law requires an “equitable allocation” of funds based on “the client’s level of need,” the evidence showed at the hearing that APD’s actual system is not consistent with the system described in the iBudget statute.

2,         APD told the Florida Legislature that if it adopted an iBudget system for Florida, then 64% of existing Waiver clients would see an increase in their budgets as a result of the iBudget.   However, APD later made a “policy decision” that funding increases simply would not be given and the algorithm would be used only to reduce, not increase a client’s allocation of funds.

3.         Former University of Florida Professor Dr. McClave (an expert in statistics and econometrics who has written text books on these types of models and created successful Florida Medicaid models) reviewed and tested the APD algorithm and testified on behalf of the Petitioners that it was statistically unreliable, including that APD’s chosen algorithm had a margin of error of over 40%!  He said that this is not a model based on a valid statistics approach, and that the model was unacceptable in his field. He memorably testified that APD’s chosen model is as accurate as “throwing darts at a wall of numbers.”

4.         APD identified no specific legal authority that allowed it to implement the iBudget the way it is being done. APD could point to no legal authority to use a statistically unreliable algorithm, to reduce amounts determined by the algorithm, to use a “decision tree” process to reduce existing client’s budgets, to single out existing clients and assign them lower budgets, or to reduce budgets without any final rules at all.  Recognizing the shortcomings of its own position, APD admitted it asked the Florida Legislature in 2012 to change the iBudget statute to  conform to how APD was actually implementing the program.  The Legislature declined to make the revisions. Regardless, APD simply continued to implement the system using its system rather than one consistent with the statute.

5.         APD’s statistics expert (Dr. Niu), who designed the algorithm, testified that he did what his client (APD) asked him to do and he did his best.  He did not consider other state’s algorithms. His reason was that he did not need to because he “only relies on [him]self.”  He used a very few variables (about seven), and assumed he could drop out some variables (such as the entire physical status portion of the QSI) on the basis that other, similar variables (such as the behavioral status portion of the QSI) tended to measure about the same thing—not realizing that every DD client doesn’t have both physical and behavioral needs, or does not have them in equal force. The result—those with significant physical needs, but no significant behavioral needs, will get substantially lower budgets than those with equally costly behavioral needs.

Also, it was shocking to learn that Dr. Niu “meant to do testing” to ensure the validity of the model, but then just did not get around to performing the type of testing necessary to ensure the validity of the model.  He did no testing against other years’ budgets (as is commonly done in statistics, apparently), or “log” method testing (as is typically done in statistics, apparently, when the model is a budget allocation or distribution model).  This was the case even though Dr. Niu has done a much simpler distribution model for the Florida Department of Transportation, and he did do “log” method testing for that model.

Dr. Niu also had no response to the UF Professor’s testimony that the algorithm was not statistically valid.  In fact, he said complimentary things about the other expert, Dr. McClave, and hoped his model “would get better over time.”

NoteAPD testified that it will analyze each client’s iBudget every 12 months to determine what further cuts can be made.  When APD decides it is appropriate, it may (or may not) re-run the inaccurate algorithm in any year it wants.  Under the proposed rules, APD has authority to use the proposed subjective methods in the rule to further reduce client services at its discretion. However, for future years, the processes which permit increases for extraordinary, one-time, temporary and changed needs will no longer be available to the person whose services are being reduced.  Of course, if the algorithm dictates an increase for a DD client, APD will still have the ability to find that award is “really just not medically necessary,” since APD continues to be the sole determiner of what is and what is not medically necessary.

APD’s arguments in response to Petitioners’ case were as follows: We worked really hard on this system; the Tier system has expired and, if this new system is thrown out, APD cannot return to the Tier system; we did our best; we do have authority to do what we did (without specific reference to any law or statute); and, mainly, the Florida Legislature is very happy with APD because APD has substantially cut the cost of the DD waiver program with APD’s interpretation of the iBudget system!  In fact, APD testified that the Legislature “rewarded” APD as a “thank you” for doing such a good job with two additional appropriations totaling $60 million, which APD used internally and to bring people off the waitlist.  [The judge asked if APD should have put that into the iBudget calculations and reappropriated the money to the existing DD clients, and APD said no; the Judge asked if APD had re-run the algorithm since APD first did it (one time) based upon each years’ new appropriation, and APD said, “No, and we are not going to.”]

And, finally, there was the real client example offered at the hearing: An amazing and articulate father of a DD 26-year-old came in and told his son’s story—with a 20 IQ, he lives in a home inherited by his father, which permits his son and two other DD clients to have extremely reduced rent.  All need 24-hour supervision, which they can barely piece together between the three of them—with less and less money each year, less and less of a rate of payment each year.  And, now, all three have been given iBudget reduction notices (his son’s, alone, is an over $8,000 reduction under iBudget).  They were barely making it since their budget is already to the bone (even with the father’s substantial assistance). With the cuts now proposed, there is no hope and nowhere for them to live, except an institution were these cuts to be implemented.

With that, the story of this proposed iBudget system was told.  The agency admitted it was not following the statute to implement the system and the model being used cannot be shown to be statistically reliable.  They agreed that cuts may continue each year. Even if every client could bring into an individual hearing an expert statistician to object to algorithm used to calculate the proposed reduction, the DCF Fair Hearing Officers lack the authority to find the rules invalid. Only DOAH has that authority.  Thus, the reason why this case is before DOAH for a decision, and why it is so crucial a test case.

A decision will be issued around the end of August or early September.  The lawyers for the Petitioners agreed to file this case without sufficient cash in hand on the hope that once the DD community knew the truth about the proposed iBudget system, they would join together to support efforts to compel APD to use an algorithm that is statistically reliable  and a process that follows the law. The Petitioners’ lawyers brought this David and Goliath case, did it in an unbelievably short period of time and, as a result, kept the costs to a bare minimum ($225,000).  Our team, led by Gigi Rollini, presented a clear, articulate, and persuasive case.  And, now, we have to pay her!  [And did I mention that in addition to APD’s seven attorneys and the work they all created, there was also surprise evidence sent by APD at 8:30 am the final day of trial, and surprise witnesses on the final day of witness disclosure—less than one week before hearing—including an expert APD brought in at the last minute and paid $85,000 for his service. And despite the additional work and expense tied to this surprise witness, he ultimately did not even testify because he had nothing to say after hearing Dr. McClave.]

Please contribute now to help us to meet our $125,000 goal!  To get there, we are asking that you consider donating at least at the $10,000 level.  We also specially thank those increasing this to the $20,000 level—we could not do this without you!

Please be a part of the solution!  There are two easy ways to contribute to the APD iBudget Proposed Rule Challenge:

(1)       Checks may be made out to Holland & Knight LLP, and sent to ATTN:  Gigi Rollini, Post Office Drawer 810, Tallahassee, Florida32302; or

(2)          Payment by wire transfer to:

Wells Fargo Bank N.A.

420 Montgomery Street

San Francisco, CA 94104-1207

ABA # 121000248

Account # 2090002390441

For Credit to: Holland & Knight, LLP

Please indicate “APD iBudget Proposed Rule Challenge” as the Beneficiary Reference in the wire.

Thank you!

–Megan Wall, Managing Attorney, St. Johns County Legal Aid


AAIDD Announces its 2013-2014 Board of Directors

March 6, 2013, Washington, DC

The American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) is extremely pleased to announce its 2013–2014 Board of Directors, effective July 1, 2013. The Board of AAIDD is elected by its membership in annual elections. The members of the 2013–2014 AAIDD Board of Directors are:

President: James Thompson, PhD, FAAIDD
Professor, Department of Special Education, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois

President-Elect: Amy Hewitt, PhD, FAAIDD
Director, Research and Training Center on Community Living, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Vice President: Susan B. Palmer, PhD
Research Professor, Beach Center on Disability, Kansas University Center on Developmental Disabilities, Lawrence, Kansas

Secretary-Treasurer: Patti N. Martin, MEd
Executive Director, Montgomery 31 Board, Montgomery, Alabama

Past President: Marc J. Tassé, PhD, FAAIDD
Professor, Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry, The Ohio State University, Columbus
Director, Nisonger Center at The Ohio State University, a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities

At-Large Members:

Loui Lord Nelson, PhD, FAAIDD
Post-doctoral Fellow, CAST and Boston College, Boston, Massachusetts

Susan L. Parish, PhD, MSW, FAAIDD
Nancy Lurie Marks Professor of Disability Policy and Director, Lurie Institute for Disability Policy, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts

Elizabeth A. Perkins, PhD, RNMH, FAAIDD
Associate Director and Research Assistant Professor, Florida Center for Inclusive Communities UCEDD, University of South Florida

Peter J. Smith, MD, MA, FAAIDD
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago
Associate Director, Illinois LEND, University of Illinois-Chicago

***

Founded in 1876, AAIDD is the oldest professional association concerned with intellectual and developmental disabilities. AAIDD advocates for the equality, dignity, and human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and for their full inclusion and participation in society. Learn more about the organization at www.aaidd.org.

See the full press release here:  http://www.aaidd.org/news/news_item.cfm?OID=10738

Hello All!

Get your feet ready for the Brevard PALS 4th Annual Run/Walk!

 

The race is just about 1 month away and I think it will be bigger and more fun for all racers, walkers and families!

 

We have a very exciting addition to this year’s race. 

 

Kevin Soto with the Brevard County Manatees has donated 70 undated tickets to this season’s games. 

 

It is a $280 value that we will be able to raffle off on the day of the race!

 

wrist radio This is a comment I received from a reader.  I thought this was well worth our review.

Autistic people can be some of the most vulnerable dependent adults in the universe. Mainly, because they are at the mercy of others who care for them and can take advantage of them by blaming abuse on the autistic person themselves. You have to be a seriously sadistic, cruel coward to prey upon defenseless, non verbal, severely-autistic people.

on iphoneThere is an epidemic of trusted caregivers from school personnel to home health workers who are being CAUGHT on tape ABUSING autistic people. What are YOU doing about this? Why aren’t more people addressing this hidden violence towards our autistic children?

http://www.hlntv.com/video/2012/09/27/caught-tape-autistic-man-allegedly-abused-caregivers

These caregivers better get the maximum sentence! http://iwidk.com/2012/09/21/horrible-caregivers-caught-on-video-beating-autistic-man-hundreds-of-times-video/