teaching


bulliesFighting Fair

The Philistine also said, “Today I stand and make fun of the army of Israel! Let me have one of your men to fight!”  I Sam 17:10

Introduction–A few years ago, two young men tried to steal my purse from me by grabbing it and driving off in their car.  They weren’t able to get my purse or really hurt me.  You see, even through they were driving a Honda and there were two of them and only one of me, it was not a fair fight because God was on my side.  As we look at the story of David and Goliath, I want us to think about what makes a fair fight.  Have a member read I Samuel 17:10.

  1.  The story of David and Goliath.  Goliath was taunting the Army of Israel and making fun of them.  He said to send one man to fight.  (I Samuel 17)
    1. What Goliath didn’t know was that this was not a fair fight.
    2. He thought he had the advantage but God had the advantage
    3. God sent David to the camp to be able to fight Goliath and to win.
    4. What we need to understand is that God wants us to win every battle and to have the victory everytime and in every way.
  1. God gives victory to his children because he loves us.
  2. Last week we had a funeral for my brother-in-law and it was sad but wonderful because we were able to spend time together and be with the family that does not know Jesus as their Savior and we saw the young people ministering to each other.
  3. Have you ever been in a problem and seen God turn that problem around for your good?
  1. I have a person in my life that has tried to hurt me and my family.  This person has only made us stronger people.
  2. I had a person one time who wanted to really hurt me; and for a while it seemed to work. Then in my hurt, I found SpG and God gave me all you folks to love me and for me to love.

Conclusion:   God doesn’t fight fair when it comes to his children.  There will be people who will try to hurt you; but they cannot because God is on your side and he always gives us victory.

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wordsTonight I had a pleasant surprise when I met a friend who is also a member of Special Gathering during my late afternoon walk.  My friend, M.J. was meeting with her reading tutor in the park. Her tutor explained that they often take a walk in the park to help  M.J. loosen up and prepare her for her next reading assignment.

At the time I saw them, they weren’t walking but M.J. was reading out loud.  I came on them at the end of her lesson; and by the time I reached them, they were preparing to leave.

It seemed interesting to me that M.J.’s teacher wanted to explain to me why they had her lessons in the park.  It is a very public place.  In fact, it was such a busy spot that I wondered if M.J. would be comfortable reading out loud with all the people who stroll through the area.

reading

Understand, I’m not questioning this tutor’s methods or abilities.  What I did question was the propriety of having an adult woman learning to read in this public park at a time when people are routinely walking their dogs, exercising and meandering through the area.  In conducting a reading lesson, it is logical that the student must read out loud.  Thereby, the teacher can access the effectiveness of her instruction.

child readingI’ve heard my friend read.  Her ability is at a kindergarten to first grade level.  I have my Master’s degree and I would be self-conscious reading aloud in such a public venue.  M.J. is a sharp, stylish young woman in her early twenties.  If comfortable in her surroundings, she can be boisterous.  But her typical behavior is shy and withdrawn.  I cannot imagine that she is able to function at her best while reading in the park.

Over the years, I seen men and women who are professionals use a lack of judgement regarding the feelings and emotional well-being of people who are intellectually disabled.  My concern is that this is another case of a well-meaning teacher finding an atmosphere which puts her student at a disadvantage.

Am I overreaching and overreacting?  Or do you think another place would be more appropriate to hold a reading lesson?

chatEven though saying what we mean is difficult, it may be harder to mean what we say.  When working with people with intellectually disabilities, I’ve found that our sub-culture is actually less prone to say things they do not mean than other segments of the population.  Yet, this is a continuing problem within our society.

A good friend of mine tells me that his wife was constantly threatening to “leave and never come back.”  He learned eventually that this was only an idle threat; but even in knowing this, it put him in continual trauma.  Finally, he realized that the sense of drama which produces trauma was her true purpose.  This is when he learned to ignore the threats.

However, threats about almost everything is a part of many people’s lives.  A parent may tell the Bible study teacher, “If that happens again, my daughter won’t be able to come back to your program.”  A member may inform you, “I’m never coming back…” if I don’t get my way.

talking to each otherOne of the great life lessons is to mean what we say.  Our members who are mentally challenged are concrete learners.  They must have truth in everything they do, especially in their relationship with the Lord. I’ve found that even some people who claim to have a vital relationship with the Lord have a little problem with mangling the truth.

Understand that I’m not speaking from the lofty tower of innocence.  I’ve caught myself more often than I care to remember torturing the truth in my speech.  When we mean what we say, there is a release that comes for everyone with whom you must interface.

“I will go” becomes a sealed covenant.  “I can’t do that” releases you and the other person from future expectations.  “If you do that, I must punish you” is a committment that should not be violated.  This week there was a conflict between two members.  One member began to curse at the other person.  I had to pull him out and ask for him to apologize.  He refused.

argueThis refusal meant that I had to separate him from the others.  Once we were in a more private area, I could reason with him.  Within a few minutes, he was able to understand what was needed and what should be done.  He agreed and could be moved back to his normal seat.  My greatest danger  in this situation was threatening something that I could not or would not do.  It was essential to mean what I said.

Only the Lord’s strength and wisdom can help us to follow through on what we say.  Asking for his help always allows us to become the people of integrity that who can be the example we need to be for our members.

praying on her kneesPrayer is an eternal mystery that haunts even the most devote warrior in God’s kingdom.  For Frances, prayer was her bread and drink.  She spent her days and nights in supplication to the Lord.  I earnestly believe that it was the prayers of Frances that turned our nation back to the Lord in a great way in the late 1950’s and 1960’s.

Of course there were many others who also prayed and sought God but I experienced first-hand the result of Frances’ ministry.  I sat under her teaching and walked hand in hand with her during her times of struggle.  I also saw her confidence in prayer.  I rejoiced in what God was accomplishing through the hours spend listening, speaking, loving and even wrestling with a holy God.

tent meetingsWhile TV pundents often proclaim that everyone was stoned during those decades, there was an underground movement that consisted of late teens and young adults whose hearts pled for God to change them and our nation.  My husband and I were part that movement–the Jesus Movement.  We led a vibrant and holy group of teenagers whose sole ambition was to find a deep relationship with Jesus.  They gathered under tents and in churches.  They fasted and held all night prayer meetings.

While the focus beamed on the teens and the other young men and women who led this army of teenagers, it was the matrons and masters of prayer–such as Frances–who had plowed the ground, planted the seed and rejoiced in the harvest.  Their battle was hard-fought.  They struggled and wrestled with the enemy of our souls on their knees, weeping, laughing and facing that dreaded enemy with grace, courage and valor. The power of the Holy Spirit never failed them.  The Father’s love always embraced them and assured them that his great destiny would save even the most horrible reprobate.

These prayer warriors didn’t possess the advantages of social media, blogs or the Internet but their prayers had world-wide and lasting effects.  Somehow, Christian leaders from around the world heard about Frances and came to her humble home for prayer.  They delighted in staying in the home of Frances and her husband. eating her food, laughing and enjoying fellowship long into the night.  But they came for prayer–recognizing her vital connection to God that brought success in ministry.

joanFew of us have been given the grace Frances possessed in determined, steadfast prayer.  Yet, all of us can seek God with the grace God has given to us.  Frances died stubbornly, without fanfare.  She resisted death even after her strength and vigor had been long spent.  I asked her oldest daughter, “Why does she struggle, resisting death so strongly?”  She believed that Frances clung to a desire to be on earth when the Lord returned.

Was this woman of God perfect?  No! Was she a warrior who helped to change the world for Christ?  Yes!

keep calmOkay! I had to do this.  But I have more reason to write about December 21, 2012 than most folk.  It’s my birthday and it’s a big one.  That is, it’s a big number.  For many people, my age might even signal the end of the world.

However, I don’t intend to go away today.  I plan to live to my societal prophetic 100 years and continue to work.  There is a great deal of freedom that comes with age.  I’ve heard from a variety of people different milestones that change you.

My good friend Mama Poulsen said that 50 was the changing age.  When my friend, Grace Caldwell, died at 79, her only regret was that she didn’t reach 80.  “Because at 80 you can say and do whatever you want.”

me rabbittSince I’ve pretty much lived that way many years of my life,  maybe it’s time for me to pull back.  Whenever I asked my husband for his opinion about a decision, he used the old phrase, “Do whatever you want.  That’s what you always end up doing anyway.”  When he said it, I chaffed at the notion.  Nevertheless, looking back, I see that he was right more times than he was wrong.

Of course, I had three children and a fairly demanding husband; but in the end, I’ve seen circumstances and realities change to the point that I seem to “end up doing whatever I want.”  Through this, I’ve learned that in the Christian life sacrificial giving often becomes a doorway to your greatest blessing.  The first really become the last and the last often finish first.

HB to meIt takes years to comprehend.  Yet in God’s economy, there is a strength in weakness.  The poor in spirit always obtain the heavenly riches.  Those who weep acquire the greatest consolation because their comfort emanates from the throne of God.  And the whole earth will be given to the humble.

Happy Birthday to me!  I pray your day will be as blessed as mine.

Christmas treeAs Pastor Iman passed Eric who paced back and forth at the back of the room, the pastor asked the young man, “What part do have in the play?”

“I’m the star,” Eric said, scratching his head and facing the inquiring man.

“Oh, that’s great but what is your part?”

“I’m the star,” Eric repeated, patiently.

“I know you are the star; but what is the part you are playing tonight?”

Eric’s autism kicked in as he nervously hit the air with his fist and said, “I told you.  I’m the star.”

Christmas playRealizing that Eric’s patience was gone, the interested Pastor walked away, still wondering what part Eric was playing in our annual Christmas play.

Sunday evening, The Special Gathering of Melbourne had our annual play and cantata.  “A Florida Christmas” is a playful enactment of the Christmas events of 2000 years ago.  One song brings tears to those of us who have learned the music.  Nevertheless,  most of the music and the play is joyfully planned to be fun.

Christmas ChoirWhile the song that introduces the wise men was sung, Eric’s part was to carry the star guiding the wise men to the Savior.  As he had reported to the inquiring pastor, Eric was the star.

After the performance, Pastor Inman came to me laughing about his mistake.

There are times that all of us are misunderstood when we are trying to communicate the best we can.  However, we must continue to repeat the facts.  We are called to teach and share the good news of Jesus and his love.  His mercy and grace are free gifts and that is the story of Christmas.  Even though others may not be able to understand that simple message, it does not diminish the truth of our Savior’s sacrifice.  After all, Jonathan Smith correctly penned in one of the song that we sang this year, “I’m not one to second guess what angels have to say, but this is such a strange way to save the world.”

For years, one of our Bible teachers at Special Gathering reviewed the same Bible verse with his class every week.  “I will pray morning, noon and night.”  As the first five years rolled around, I became a bit disturbed.  Doesn’t he know any other verses? I asked myself.  Then I came to welcome the value of what he was teaching his class.  The learning abilities of his class were limited.  He drilled them each week.  While some of the members could quote the verse easily, others struggled week after week, year after year.

Slowly, as the years melted into seven, eight years, I came to see that my understanding of the verse was deepening.  Almost every week, I would sit in his class.  I found that this simple Biblical declaration became dear to me.

“I will pray morning, noon and night,” I would mutter to myself as I climbed into my car for lunch.  At odd times, I realized that my spirit mind was telling my sub-conscious mind, I will pray morning, noon and night.  It became a call to prayer for me that became a welcomed reminder and spurred my mind to think about prayer more often.

My mother took a selling job when I was a pre-teen.  In her training, she was taught an important principle that she shared withher daughters, “Repetition brings out thought.”  For those of us who value our quick minds, we sometimes discount the value and purpose of repetition.

However, men and women who make a daily practice of memorizing scriptures, repeat even the familiar ones several times a day.  They carry their scriptures packets for review during their down times.  Not only are they learning the Word and hiding God’s message in their hearts, they are bringing out new thoughts about what God has to say to them.

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