teaching


bulliesFighting Fair

The Philistine also said, “Today I stand and make fun of the army of Israel! Let me have one of your men to fight!”  I Sam 17:10

Introduction–A few years ago, two young men tried to steal my purse from me by grabbing it and driving off in their car.  They weren’t able to get my purse or really hurt me.  You see, even through they were driving a Honda and there were two of them and only one of me, it was not a fair fight because God was on my side.  As we look at the story of David and Goliath, I want us to think about what makes a fair fight.  Have a member read I Samuel 17:10.

  1.  The story of David and Goliath.  Goliath was taunting the Army of Israel and making fun of them.  He said to send one man to fight.  (I Samuel 17)
    1. What Goliath didn’t know was that this was not a fair fight.
    2. He thought he had the advantage but God had the advantage
    3. God sent David to the camp to be able to fight Goliath and to win.
    4. What we need to understand is that God wants us to win every battle and to have the victory everytime and in every way.
  1. God gives victory to his children because he loves us.
  2. Last week we had a funeral for my brother-in-law and it was sad but wonderful because we were able to spend time together and be with the family that does not know Jesus as their Savior and we saw the young people ministering to each other.
  3. Have you ever been in a problem and seen God turn that problem around for your good?
  1. I have a person in my life that has tried to hurt me and my family.  This person has only made us stronger people.
  2. I had a person one time who wanted to really hurt me; and for a while it seemed to work. Then in my hurt, I found SpG and God gave me all you folks to love me and for me to love.

Conclusion:   God doesn’t fight fair when it comes to his children.  There will be people who will try to hurt you; but they cannot because God is on your side and he always gives us victory.

wordsTonight I had a pleasant surprise when I met a friend who is also a member of Special Gathering during my late afternoon walk.  My friend, M.J. was meeting with her reading tutor in the park. Her tutor explained that they often take a walk in the park to help  M.J. loosen up and prepare her for her next reading assignment.

At the time I saw them, they weren’t walking but M.J. was reading out loud.  I came on them at the end of her lesson; and by the time I reached them, they were preparing to leave.

It seemed interesting to me that M.J.’s teacher wanted to explain to me why they had her lessons in the park.  It is a very public place.  In fact, it was such a busy spot that I wondered if M.J. would be comfortable reading out loud with all the people who stroll through the area.

reading

Understand, I’m not questioning this tutor’s methods or abilities.  What I did question was the propriety of having an adult woman learning to read in this public park at a time when people are routinely walking their dogs, exercising and meandering through the area.  In conducting a reading lesson, it is logical that the student must read out loud.  Thereby, the teacher can access the effectiveness of her instruction.

child readingI’ve heard my friend read.  Her ability is at a kindergarten to first grade level.  I have my Master’s degree and I would be self-conscious reading aloud in such a public venue.  M.J. is a sharp, stylish young woman in her early twenties.  If comfortable in her surroundings, she can be boisterous.  But her typical behavior is shy and withdrawn.  I cannot imagine that she is able to function at her best while reading in the park.

Over the years, I seen men and women who are professionals use a lack of judgement regarding the feelings and emotional well-being of people who are intellectually disabled.  My concern is that this is another case of a well-meaning teacher finding an atmosphere which puts her student at a disadvantage.

Am I overreaching and overreacting?  Or do you think another place would be more appropriate to hold a reading lesson?

chatEven though saying what we mean is difficult, it may be harder to mean what we say.  When working with people with intellectually disabilities, I’ve found that our sub-culture is actually less prone to say things they do not mean than other segments of the population.  Yet, this is a continuing problem within our society.

A good friend of mine tells me that his wife was constantly threatening to “leave and never come back.”  He learned eventually that this was only an idle threat; but even in knowing this, it put him in continual trauma.  Finally, he realized that the sense of drama which produces trauma was her true purpose.  This is when he learned to ignore the threats.

However, threats about almost everything is a part of many people’s lives.  A parent may tell the Bible study teacher, “If that happens again, my daughter won’t be able to come back to your program.”  A member may inform you, “I’m never coming back…” if I don’t get my way.

talking to each otherOne of the great life lessons is to mean what we say.  Our members who are mentally challenged are concrete learners.  They must have truth in everything they do, especially in their relationship with the Lord. I’ve found that even some people who claim to have a vital relationship with the Lord have a little problem with mangling the truth.

Understand that I’m not speaking from the lofty tower of innocence.  I’ve caught myself more often than I care to remember torturing the truth in my speech.  When we mean what we say, there is a release that comes for everyone with whom you must interface.

“I will go” becomes a sealed covenant.  “I can’t do that” releases you and the other person from future expectations.  “If you do that, I must punish you” is a committment that should not be violated.  This week there was a conflict between two members.  One member began to curse at the other person.  I had to pull him out and ask for him to apologize.  He refused.

argueThis refusal meant that I had to separate him from the others.  Once we were in a more private area, I could reason with him.  Within a few minutes, he was able to understand what was needed and what should be done.  He agreed and could be moved back to his normal seat.  My greatest danger  in this situation was threatening something that I could not or would not do.  It was essential to mean what I said.

Only the Lord’s strength and wisdom can help us to follow through on what we say.  Asking for his help always allows us to become the people of integrity that who can be the example we need to be for our members.

praying on her kneesPrayer is an eternal mystery that haunts even the most devote warrior in God’s kingdom.  For Frances, prayer was her bread and drink.  She spent her days and nights in supplication to the Lord.  I earnestly believe that it was the prayers of Frances that turned our nation back to the Lord in a great way in the late 1950’s and 1960’s.

Of course there were many others who also prayed and sought God but I experienced first-hand the result of Frances’ ministry.  I sat under her teaching and walked hand in hand with her during her times of struggle.  I also saw her confidence in prayer.  I rejoiced in what God was accomplishing through the hours spend listening, speaking, loving and even wrestling with a holy God.

tent meetingsWhile TV pundents often proclaim that everyone was stoned during those decades, there was an underground movement that consisted of late teens and young adults whose hearts pled for God to change them and our nation.  My husband and I were part that movement–the Jesus Movement.  We led a vibrant and holy group of teenagers whose sole ambition was to find a deep relationship with Jesus.  They gathered under tents and in churches.  They fasted and held all night prayer meetings.

While the focus beamed on the teens and the other young men and women who led this army of teenagers, it was the matrons and masters of prayer–such as Frances–who had plowed the ground, planted the seed and rejoiced in the harvest.  Their battle was hard-fought.  They struggled and wrestled with the enemy of our souls on their knees, weeping, laughing and facing that dreaded enemy with grace, courage and valor. The power of the Holy Spirit never failed them.  The Father’s love always embraced them and assured them that his great destiny would save even the most horrible reprobate.

These prayer warriors didn’t possess the advantages of social media, blogs or the Internet but their prayers had world-wide and lasting effects.  Somehow, Christian leaders from around the world heard about Frances and came to her humble home for prayer.  They delighted in staying in the home of Frances and her husband. eating her food, laughing and enjoying fellowship long into the night.  But they came for prayer–recognizing her vital connection to God that brought success in ministry.

joanFew of us have been given the grace Frances possessed in determined, steadfast prayer.  Yet, all of us can seek God with the grace God has given to us.  Frances died stubbornly, without fanfare.  She resisted death even after her strength and vigor had been long spent.  I asked her oldest daughter, “Why does she struggle, resisting death so strongly?”  She believed that Frances clung to a desire to be on earth when the Lord returned.

Was this woman of God perfect?  No! Was she a warrior who helped to change the world for Christ?  Yes!

keep calmOkay! I had to do this.  But I have more reason to write about December 21, 2012 than most folk.  It’s my birthday and it’s a big one.  That is, it’s a big number.  For many people, my age might even signal the end of the world.

However, I don’t intend to go away today.  I plan to live to my societal prophetic 100 years and continue to work.  There is a great deal of freedom that comes with age.  I’ve heard from a variety of people different milestones that change you.

My good friend Mama Poulsen said that 50 was the changing age.  When my friend, Grace Caldwell, died at 79, her only regret was that she didn’t reach 80.  “Because at 80 you can say and do whatever you want.”

me rabbittSince I’ve pretty much lived that way many years of my life,  maybe it’s time for me to pull back.  Whenever I asked my husband for his opinion about a decision, he used the old phrase, “Do whatever you want.  That’s what you always end up doing anyway.”  When he said it, I chaffed at the notion.  Nevertheless, looking back, I see that he was right more times than he was wrong.

Of course, I had three children and a fairly demanding husband; but in the end, I’ve seen circumstances and realities change to the point that I seem to “end up doing whatever I want.”  Through this, I’ve learned that in the Christian life sacrificial giving often becomes a doorway to your greatest blessing.  The first really become the last and the last often finish first.

HB to meIt takes years to comprehend.  Yet in God’s economy, there is a strength in weakness.  The poor in spirit always obtain the heavenly riches.  Those who weep acquire the greatest consolation because their comfort emanates from the throne of God.  And the whole earth will be given to the humble.

Happy Birthday to me!  I pray your day will be as blessed as mine.

Christmas treeAs Pastor Iman passed Eric who paced back and forth at the back of the room, the pastor asked the young man, “What part do have in the play?”

“I’m the star,” Eric said, scratching his head and facing the inquiring man.

“Oh, that’s great but what is your part?”

“I’m the star,” Eric repeated, patiently.

“I know you are the star; but what is the part you are playing tonight?”

Eric’s autism kicked in as he nervously hit the air with his fist and said, “I told you.  I’m the star.”

Christmas playRealizing that Eric’s patience was gone, the interested Pastor walked away, still wondering what part Eric was playing in our annual Christmas play.

Sunday evening, The Special Gathering of Melbourne had our annual play and cantata.  “A Florida Christmas” is a playful enactment of the Christmas events of 2000 years ago.  One song brings tears to those of us who have learned the music.  Nevertheless,  most of the music and the play is joyfully planned to be fun.

Christmas ChoirWhile the song that introduces the wise men was sung, Eric’s part was to carry the star guiding the wise men to the Savior.  As he had reported to the inquiring pastor, Eric was the star.

After the performance, Pastor Inman came to me laughing about his mistake.

There are times that all of us are misunderstood when we are trying to communicate the best we can.  However, we must continue to repeat the facts.  We are called to teach and share the good news of Jesus and his love.  His mercy and grace are free gifts and that is the story of Christmas.  Even though others may not be able to understand that simple message, it does not diminish the truth of our Savior’s sacrifice.  After all, Jonathan Smith correctly penned in one of the song that we sang this year, “I’m not one to second guess what angels have to say, but this is such a strange way to save the world.”

For years, one of our Bible teachers at Special Gathering reviewed the same Bible verse with his class every week.  “I will pray morning, noon and night.”  As the first five years rolled around, I became a bit disturbed.  Doesn’t he know any other verses? I asked myself.  Then I came to welcome the value of what he was teaching his class.  The learning abilities of his class were limited.  He drilled them each week.  While some of the members could quote the verse easily, others struggled week after week, year after year.

Slowly, as the years melted into seven, eight years, I came to see that my understanding of the verse was deepening.  Almost every week, I would sit in his class.  I found that this simple Biblical declaration became dear to me.

“I will pray morning, noon and night,” I would mutter to myself as I climbed into my car for lunch.  At odd times, I realized that my spirit mind was telling my sub-conscious mind, I will pray morning, noon and night.  It became a call to prayer for me that became a welcomed reminder and spurred my mind to think about prayer more often.

My mother took a selling job when I was a pre-teen.  In her training, she was taught an important principle that she shared withher daughters, “Repetition brings out thought.”  For those of us who value our quick minds, we sometimes discount the value and purpose of repetition.

However, men and women who make a daily practice of memorizing scriptures, repeat even the familiar ones several times a day.  They carry their scriptures packets for review during their down times.  Not only are they learning the Word and hiding God’s message in their hearts, they are bringing out new thoughts about what God has to say to them.

Ethel was a Bible teacher at Special Gathering.  Additionally, she wrote many books for the mentally challenged community and they were published in our monthly newsletter.  Ethel and I shared a passion for writing and Special Gathering.  Therefore, we became good friends through our shared ministry concerns.  In addition, we both excelled at “going to lunch” and we practiced that part of our friendship often.

Ethel wrote for our monthly newsletter “Connecting Point,” and she was incredibly faithful in her efforts.  Even after she moved to Volusia County, Ethel always met our deadlines; and she wrote with great skill and feeling for the special needs population.
As a Bible teacher, Ethel could not be matched.  She taught the Scriptures with a keen eye for truth and clarity.  Her class was a verse-by-verse discussion study for our readers.  It has become the model for our leadership and readers classes.
My first view of Ethel came 22 years ago through Sarah, her daughter who was mentally challenged.  It was my first year at Camp Agape, our annual ministry retreat.  Sarah was my bunk mate.  I had the top bunk and she had the bottom.
On Sunday afternoon, after two days of camp, I thought I was too tired to climb to the top bunk.  Therefore, I decided to lay on Sarah’s bottom bed, thinking that she would never notice or understand.  I was wrong!
Sarah came into the cabin and jumped me.  “Get off my bed,” she insisted. “You can’t get on my bed!”  Ethel had taught Sarah well.  It is vital for our population to understand their rights and Sarah knew that I was an intruder and she wasn’t intimidated by me.  Ethel treated Sarah as an adult, and she allowed Sarah the dignity of being valued for being a child of the Lord.
One year, in touring our campgrounds, Ethel asked Sarah what she liked best about camp.  Immediately, Sarah said, “Pool.”
Shocked, Ethel said, “You don’t know how to play pool.”  Sarah walked over to the pool table and demonstrated to her mother that she certainly did know how to play the game.  Ethel laughed, “Guess she showed me.”
Ethel was never willing to compromise her faith.  Yet, she shared the message of Jesus with compassion and great love.  Her greatest legacy is her faith in Christ and love for all people but especially for the men and women who knew and loved her through her ministry within the mentally challenged community.

Some of the most active entries on this blog is our devotion that appears  each Sunday.  I get feedback from people who enjoy the devotion who don’t share it with anyone.  Others tell me that they use the devotion occasionally to teach or share with a group.  This week, I wanted to share one about two of my favorite subjects–the resurrection and my mother.

He Is Alive

Matthew 28:6

Central Theme:  Jesus is not dead; he is alive.

Introduction–Tell the story from Matthew 28:1-15  Two  women were coming.  There was an earthquake.  An angel appeared.  The stone was rolled away.  The soldier saw the angel.  They fainted  The women came up and the angel told them.  He is Alive!  Go! Tell the disciples.”  As they went back to the disciples, Jesus appeared.   Have a member read Matthew 28:6

I.     Before my mother died I struggled with my prayers for my mother.

  • A. She was an amazing woman, the best Christian I ever met.
  • B. I love her and I will miss her everyday.
  • C. But when she died, she went to be with Jesus.

1.  That will makes her happy.

II.     Because of the resurrection of Jesus, we have great hope.

  • A. I know that Jesus lives.
  • B. I know that Jesus has taken the stringer out of death.
  • 1.  Did you know that when a bee stings, it looses its stinger and dies
  • C. Jesus took the stinger from death and we don‘t have to worry anymore.

III.     Jesus was alive and the women knew it.

1.  His resurrection changed their lives.

Conclusions:  Jesus’ resurrection changes our lives, too.

We all understand that our federal government is divided into three co-equal branches.  There is the executive branch, the legislative and the judicial branches.  The purpose of these three branches of government is to insure that the people of the US receive justice.  You see, very few people (masses or individuals) are just.  We tend to see things through the biases with which we have been raised and in which we live.

During the history of the Jewish people, especially during the time of Ezekiel, the nation God had chosen was being punished because they were wicked.  In fact, Ezekiel tells us that they were so evil that they thought God was the one who was bad.  In reality, we all live with a hint of that suspicion dwelling in our minds and seeping into our hearts.

Before I became a parent, I thought my mother and father were mean and hateful.  Then I had children; and I understood that they were simply trying to mold us into mature adults.  In fact, I often think that they were kind of soft on us.  I know of other parents who decided that they would be harder on their children because their parents were too easy.  “I thought my folks were tough but I’ve realized that they were wimps,” one neighbor confessed, while nursing a steaming cup of coffee.

The reality is that we cannot understand God.  Therefore, because his actions are so foreign to us, we think that God is mean.  The executive director and pastor of The Special Gathering often says that we can only see things through our own perspective.  That means that we understand what is happening from the way we see it.

Even though, it’s a hard lesson, we must learn to trust God and believe that His way is right no matter what happens.  Years ago, I was taking my children to the beach.  Usually, I would put the car keys in my pocket and lock my pocketbook in the trunk.  That day, scruffling to get everything out to the ocean, I forgot to lock my car and my purse up.

That night, I went to the car to get something out of my pocketbook and realized that my purse was gone.  I climbed back into the car, attempting to re-track my steps.  All the time I was driving, I was doing spiritual battle with myself.  That day, while sitting at the beach, watching my children play, I had promised the Lord that when bad things happened, I would no longer blame Him but I would realize that I was to blame and take on the guilt for my mistakes.

Prior to this day, my carnal logic was that because I turn everything over to the Lord, He should keep me from doing stupid things.  Of course, it’s not godly thinking but it was my thinking.

As I scouring the community for my pocketbook that had our checkbook, credit cards and pretty much all of our financial lifeblood in it, I kept struggling with myself to acknowledge that God was not to blame for this problem.  Again and again, I would say out loud, “Lord, I know this isn’t your fault.  I know that I lost the pocketbook, not you.”  My mouth was saying one thing but my heart wanted to scream “God, why did you let this happen to ME?”  Finally, I said, “Lord, it doesn’t matter how I feel.  I know that you are not to blame.  I made the mistake.  I am to blame.  I will not blame you.”

As I walked into the door from my desperate searching, the phone was ringing.  “This is the Rockledge police department.  We have your pocketbook.  Can you come and get it?”  That night I experienced a clear act of God’s mercy and grace.  I learned to not blame God for my mistakes.  God is not responsible for my goofing up.

As a merciful bonus, I only had $.47 in my wallet.  The thieves took the money.  Then they tossed everything into the bushes on a lonely, almost deserted road.  A car behind them happened to see them toss the pocketbook.  He stopped, retieved my purse and took it to the police department.  Nothing was missing.  None of the credit cards had been used.

The Lord used this driver, even a couple of thieves to teach me a valuable lesson about His justice.  Because we are people who do not really understand what is right, we need God to help us understand.  Many times he uses other people to teach us about his loving and just ways.

As a child I could not memorize.  I could learn, of course, but anything that had to be memorized was a loss for me.  For years I wanted to learn the names of the disciples but I felt it was too hard.  Then one day I decided that I was going to do it.  I worked out a system that seemed easy.  Even though, my brother tells me that I can make even the simpliest things difficult, this system works for me.  Perhaps it will help you also.

I began with the first book of the New Testament:  Matthew

From the word, Matthew, I created an acrostic of the names of three disciples that are often over looked and are the hardest for me to remember.  Using the first four letters of Matthew’s name, I learned the first four disciples:

1.  Matthew

2.  Andrew

3.  Thaddeus

4.  Thomas

Then I listed all the “J” names because they were the easiest to recall.  I arrange them in alphabetical order:

5.  James (the brother of Jesus)

6.  James the Lesser

7.  John

8.  Judas

There are two Simons:

9.  Simon the Zealot

10. Simon Peter

That only leaves two disciples:

11. Bartholemew

12. Philip

Even if this system doesn’t seem to be easy for you , my method might jar your brain into figuring out a method that works for you.  Using this system, I was able to teach my class of adults who are mentally challenged all the names of the disciples in about three weeks.  Of course, you will have to review them pretty often to keep the name sealed in your brain.  Yet with this method, you will have several memory hooks to hang the names in your brain.  Happy memorizing!

Recently, I began teaching a Bible class for higher function adults who are mentally challenged.  I am currently teaching them the books of the New Testament.  Most of us who have been in church for years know more about the Bible than we imagine.  This week, our class learned about half of the books in the New Testament.  Here are come cues to help you learn the New Testament books in the Bible.

First, there are the four gospels.  They are

  • Matthew
  • Mark
  • Luke
  • John

After the resurrection, Jesus ascended to heaven and the church was built by the

  • Acts of the Apostles

Then we have recorded, the letters from Paul.  They are divided into two segments–letters to cities and letters to young pastors and friends.  The first three Pauline letters are easy because they are longer in length and many people teach and preach from them.  They are:

  • Romans
  • I Corinthians
  • II Corinthians

After this there are four books that almost no one remembers.  However, there is an easy acronym that will help remember.  It is General Electric Power Company.

  • Galatians
  • Ephesians
  • Philippians
  • Colossians

We already know that Revelations is the last book of the New Testament.  We have now learned 13 of the 27 books.  There are only 14 left.  Dividing Paul’s letters will again make things easier.  First, there two more letters written to cities.

  • I Thessalonians
  • II Thessalonians

Now there are four letters written to his friends.  Again, it’s easy to remember because the first two are written to his adopted son:

  • I Timothy
  • II Timothy
  • Titus
  • Philemon

Philemon is the only one that may be difficult to remember.  However, since it is the only one that will be difficult, you will simply need to remember it.  The next letter is disputed as to who wrote the letter.  Many believe it is Paul.  Therefore, it makes it easier to remember.  The book is

  • Hebrews

The other letters are written by well-known apostles.  James, Peter and John and Jude.  The main thing is to remember the order of these books.  I recall them backwards.  John wrote the three letters and Revelation.  Jude is stuck in between the two John letters because there are some disputes about the true author of the epistles (another word for letters).  Here are the final books in order:

  • James
  • I Peter
  • II Peter
  • I John
  • II John
  • III John
  • Jude
  • Revelation
That’s all 27.  Teaching yourself is simple.  Adding a small set each week, you can also teach your Bible class the books of the New Testament.

Inbred within us resides a desire to be in control of our own lives.  Often, when children are playing,  an argument will begin or end with one child yelling,  “You don’t control me.”

Prisons are designed to control people.  They are the ultimate punishment in an attempt to bring someone under submission to the will of to society’s rules and regulations.  Often in the Scriptures, a Biblical hero will find himself in jail.

Whether the punishment is justified or unjustified, there are two important things that no one can control in your life.  They are

1.  What we think, and

2.  Who we worship.

While these two areas will determine a great deal about me, I am totally in control of both of them.  No matter how dominate another person may be, he or she will never be able to totally control my thought life or before whom I bow as my God.

Much of how we think is determined by our past.  Years ago, my friend, Jesse, and I were driving along the ocean.  One condo was beautifully landscaped.  I commented about the beautiful flowers and lush flora.  Jesse and her husband had been the manger of a large condo complex for about five years.  She looked at me as though I had lost mind.  “It looks a lot of work to me,” she said in an angry, almost resentful tone.  Her job at the condo had been to keep the landscaping weeded and blooming.  For me, the rich and colorful garden that surrounded the buildings were exquisite.  For Jesse, they brought back long hours of never-ending work under the unrelenting Florida sun.

Yet, the past is not always an accurate predictor of outcomes.  We have all heard of people who lived plush lives, handed every convenience who turn to passion or crime as a mere diversion.  Yet, another man or woman will come from the most horrid circumstances.  These mistreatments only serve to spur ahead the resolve of this person to live godly and holy lives of kindness,  generosity and love.

At this point, I believe who we worship becomes a determining factor.  If our worship is wrapped in the flimsy gauze of self-love, our thinking will be distorted and shallow.  However, if we dig deep into the wells of true godly purity, our whole being will become reseviors of humility, honor and mercy.  A good friend came from a distressful childhood.  Unwanted and despised by her mother, she struggles today battling bouts of overwhelming depression.  Nevertheless, this woman is a beacon of love and joy for all who know her because of her determination to overcome her deficiencies with a desperate love for Jesus.

What we think and who we worship becomes who we are.  Who is your God?  And what are your routine thoughts?  How much would replacing godly thoughts change your life?

A sacristy

The other day I received the key to a local church where The Special Gathering main office is located.  Because the sanctuary has been recently remodeled, new keys had to be made.  The key was labeled “The sacristy.”  I thought the person who labeled the key had misspelled the word sanctuary.

Later, I looked up the word and found that a sacristy is a small room usually off the sanctuary where vestments, church records and sacred vessels are kept.  The Special Gathering office is located immediately off the sanctuary in this church.  Our office would be considered part of the sacristy by someone who is not familiar with the inner workings of this local congregation.

I laughed at myself that I was stumped by this word that was new to me.  However, the situation introduces a common problem for the mentally challenged community–reading the English language.

Reading is always problematic for our members who are mentally challenged.  Even good readers may stumble while reading a difficult Bible passage or part of their lesson.  At Special Gathering, our readers’ classes are important learning grounds.  Most often, it is our leadership who attend these classes.

If you ask your members to read, there are a couple of things that you might want to be aware.

  1. Helping with correct pronunciation is almost always appreciated.
  2. Depending on the reading level of the class, I will sometimes move from student to student as they take turns reading.  In this way, if I need to help someone, he is not embarrassed because I’ve moved from person to person.  This makes his need for correction less obvious.
  3. I find that moving my finger under the words as the person reads may be helpful.
  4. I often pronounce the word quietly, thereby, not highlighting the problem.

Helping our readers is vital because we need to be sure that they are reading the passage correctly.  However, it is equally important to preserve their dignity.

What are some of the ways you have learned to help in reading situations?  Are there other disability issues which could be sensitive to the feelings of members?

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