healing


During choir practice several days ago, I asked the choir to vote on what songs they would like to sing when we perform at Eastminster Presbyterian Church in Indialantic, Florida, on March 30.  We will be ministering at their 10:30am worship service.  The Special Gathering Choir is a choir of individuals who are developmentally delayed.  To my amazement, they didn’t and wouldn’t raise their hands to tell me their choice. 

When Tim spoke out that he liked the second song best, everyone chimed in to agree with him.  I was surprised–not at their selection but in their hesitation to raise their hands regarding their choice.  These men and woman are the leaders in our ministry in Melbourne.  They are our deacons,  the ones who come forward to pray, lead singing, read the scriptures and greet visitors.  Yet, they were hesitant to give their opinion regarding their choice in a musical selection.  Once again they were exhibiting their need to please people who are in authority.  They didn’t want to be wrong and not please me.

I can only vaguely imagine the intimidation that my friends have endured that make them too afraid to give their opinion to me.  I am their friend and they know it.  These 13 men and women are not timid wallflowers.  They are forward looking individuals who laugh and joke and seem to express their opinions with ease.  Now, I wonder.  How much are they hiding?  How much of this self-confidence is another set of learned behaviors exhibited to impress the outside world?

There is much to learn about unlocking the potential of these men and women of God.  Pray for us as we seek to evangelize, teach and disciple God’s forgotten people.

On December 13, 2006, I injured my eye ball.  It caused what the doctors called a Recurrent Corneal Erosion.  In simple terms, the skin on my eyeball would dissolve in the middle of the night and I would wake up in terrible pain.  There is no cure.  It appeared that this would be a condition I would live with for the rest of my life. 

I spent countless, sleeplesss nights in pain.  I was under constant care of the doctor.  In the end, I had two operations on my eye.  The Special Gathering caught the need for the Lord to heal me.  Chrissy especially realized that God is merciful and He would hear her prayer.  To be honest, I was in too much pain to have much faith.  But not Chrissy.

Every day, several times a day, Chrissy prayed for my eye.  Chrissy has CP and has been confined to a wheelchair all of her life.  She does not talk but she can communicate and she can pray.

The last attack on my eye was at the end of September 2007.  Four glorious months ago, without pain.  But Chrissy has remained faithful to pray for me each day.  Chrissy understands what James wrote that the effective, fervant prayer of a righteous woman does a lot of good. 

I am so grateful to the Lord for healing my eye and I am so indebted to Chrissy who prayed for me when I was too weak in my faith to pray.  The Special Gathering members often have no boundries in their ability to touch the heart of God because they understand Him.  They, often, don’t understand unbelief.

Have you seen God use men and women who are mentally challenged in exceptional ways?  What have you learned about faith from them?

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