April 2012


Jesus will Come Again

Acts1:11

Central Theme:  Jesus will return to earth and take us home.

 Introduction–Look in the sky.  Tell about looking up trying to see if Jesus was coming.  This is not a silly things.  Because Jesus is coming back and we are to be looking for him.  Have a member read Acts 1:11

I.     Jesus ascended into heaven.  An angel appeared and said, “He will return just as he left. ”

A. Since then Christians have been looking for him.

B. We should be expecting him.

C. I knew  lady who said, “My parents were looking and he didn‘t come.  Don‘t waste your time.”  Looking for Jesus is never a waste of time.  It is hope and the center of our life as a Christian.

II.     We are to live as though we have years to fill with good works for the Lord.

A. Yet we are to live as though Jesus will return any minute.

B. There is no problem with that

C. We are not to stop work and look at the sky all the time.

III.     Looking for Jesus means that we are to be active and ready.

A. We are waiting for Camp Agape to come in May.  We are excited.

B. Do we sit down and wait.  NO because we must pack our clothes and fill out of form.  Maybe we even need to work to earn the money.

C. We look forward but we continue to work.

Conclusion      Jesus is coming again; we should wait for him with joy and hope.

 Boundaries Boot Camp:  A Social Toolkit for Teens or Young Adults

 

Teachers, parents, or support staff – are you looking for ways to develop and provide interventions for individuals with autism or Asperger’s disorder? Learn specialized ways to tackle social boundaries, develop and maintain relationships, and attend to health, hygiene, and sexuality issues. Resources are provided to attendees that include relevant research, evidence-based best practices, practical strategies for intervention, and more.

 

  • Understanding of intervention strategies and research
  • Identify common behaviors that individuals with ASD demonstrate in challenging situations
  • Identify potential triggers for problem behavior in community based settings 
  • Demonstrate possible intervention techniques for the above mentioned issues. 

 

$75

 Friday, July 27, 2012

10 am – 4 pm with lunch included

 Located in Melbourne, FL at the Scott Center

 

Questions? Contact us by emailing
abaceu@fit.edu or call our offices at
1 (321) 674-8382

 

 

 

Contact Info
Continuing Education
Florida Institute of Technology
2202 Babcock St Ste 103
Melbourne, FL 32901
Phone: (321) 674-8382
Fax: (321) 674-7050
Email: conted@fit.edu
Office Hours: 9:00AM-5:00PM EST

 

On Monday of this week, I spent almost all day working on The Special Gathering of Indian River data base.  Then I printed a set of labels for our members,  one for our elders and friends and a third set for local church pastors.  I also printed our monthly pastors’ letter using the data base to personalize each letter.

While our data base system is much more complicated than any system with which I’ve ever worked, I do understand how it works.  True, I spent about three years confused about how to do certain things; but our executive director and I spent three days a couple of months ago teaching me the in’s and out’s of the system.  Now I know have a handle on what is needed and how to make the data base do what I need for it to do.

I was particularly happy Monday night because I had updated the system, printed my labels and gotten my letters printed with the March 2012 income/expense statement on the back of the letters.  Each time I passed the table where they rested, I was happy that I’ve gotten all the little hitches straightened out; and I could accomplish the job correctly.

This morning when the Newsletter team was labeling the newsletter, I got a text.  “Your letters and labels don’t match.  They are way off.”  Each month we send our monthly 12-page ministry newsletter to pastors and include a letter updating the churches with what has happened during the month.  Puzzled, I texted back.

How could this happen?  I was so proud of my accomplishment.  The pastor’s letter is put into the newsletter.  We print the letters and the labels in the same order so that they coordinate, making it easy for the newsletter team to match letters to labels.

Just as I was getting over the shock of my scrambled labels, I got another text.  “Ran out of newsletters for you because you ran too many labels for your members.”  Somehow I’d run double labels for our members.  Disheartened and confused, all I wanted to do was to drive the 50 miles to see if I could help straighten out my mess.

There are times that we flub an endeavor and we know that we haven’t done a job quite up to par.  But then there are times like today when we believe that we have done a good job–perhaps the best in years–and find that we have scrambled and confused everything, making a lot of extra work for someone else.

I am again reminded of Titus.  Paul emphasized to his young pastor friend that as leaders we must always be seeking to live a disciplined life.  That means we should be seeking God to purify us.  I was really humbled today.  My inability to do my job correctly meant that other people had to work twice as hard doing their job.

None of us live in a vacuum.  Almost everything we do affects someone else in some way.  Early this morning, my good friend, Diana, texted me and simply said, “I love you and I’m praying for you today.”  Later in the day, I was extremely grateful for her prayers because of the mistakes I’d made.  Even though I’ll tell her how much I appreciate her text and why it meant a lot to me, she probably won’t be able to imagine what an encouragement her prayers were to me.

Have you had a scrambled day?  Was there someone who reached out to you?  Perhaps you were able to be a Diana to another person today.  How did that happen?

 

A few days ago a Special Gathering volunteer came to me and said, “I believe that the Lord has shown me that to help Valerie, I must simply love her.  She is hurting and that is why she is so impossible to everyone.”  It’s true.  Varerie has recently lost her mother and father who were extremely protective of her.  Her sisters have resented her because of the attention she received most of over their lives; and Valerie is no longer welcomed to be with their families.  For several years, she was living in her own apartment but medical and behavioral issues forced her to move into a group home.

The staff at her new home is loving and cares deeply about Valerie.  Yet, her bossy attitude keeps everyone stirring in anger and confusion.  Each time we have Special Gathering, the residents emerge from the bus in an annoyed state, pushing and pulling of each other’s emotions.  Even some of the members of SpG are effected.  This volunteer notices the confusion that Valerie engenders.

There are so many people who are wounded that know no other reaction other than lashing out to wound others.  Is the answer as simple as what the volunteer said.  Can love simply work to heal hurts?  The answer is yes but there must also be discipline.  When Valerie decided to cause a stir later that day, the wise volunteer stepped in and firmly but gently disciplined her.  Then she hugged Valerie.

Love is training our members into truth.  In Titus, Paul wrote to a young pastor and told him to train his congregants in truth.  Paul advised him that we must love enough to disciple.  There must be a balance even for those who are wounded.  We must help the wounded by reaching out in gentle love.  Yet, when needed, we should also touch with grace and discipline with godly mercy.
Read more: http://blog.beliefnet.com/simplelife/2012/04/helping-the-wounded.html#ixzz1sRf8BEln

Here is a humorous and affectionate look into the character of Jesus.  Thanks to Susan Tanner, a Special Gathering volunteer in DeLand for sending it to me.

A Savior for All People

No matter who you are the Lord Jesus is God.  He understands and relates to you.

There were 3 good arguments that Jesus was Black:

1.   He called everyone brother,

2.   He liked the Gospel,

3.   He didn’t get a fair trial.

But then there were 3 equally good arguments that Jesus was Jewish:

1.   He went into His Father’s business,

2.   He lived at home until he was 33,

3.   He was sure his mother was a virgin and his mother was sure He was God.

But then there were 3 equally good arguments that Jesus was Italian:

1.   He talked with His hands,

2.   He had wine with His meals,

3.   He used olive oil.

But then there were 3 equally good arguments that Jesus was a Californian:

1.   He never cut His hair,

2.   He walked around barefoot all the time,

3.   He started a new religion.

But then there were 3 equally good arguments that Jesus was an American Indian:

1.   He was at peace with nature,

2.   He ate a lot of fish,

3.   He talked about the Great Spirit.

But then there were 3 equally good arguments that Jesus was Irish:

1.   He never got married,

2.   He was always telling stories,

3.   He loved green pastures.

But the most compelling evidence of all – 3 proofs that Jesus was a woman:

1.   He fed a crowd at a moment’s notice when there was virtually no food,

2.   He kept trying to get a message across to a bunch of men who just didn’t get it,

3.   And even when He was dead, He had to get up because there was still work to do.

Can I get an AMEN?

Read more: http://blog.beliefnet.com/simplelife/#ixzz1sPiRmm7P

This morning the Shuttle Discovery left Kennedy Space Center, riding piggy back on a 747 airplane.  I was totally unprepared for my own reaction.  This final flight means the space program is officially over for the US.

As the shuttle passed over our home, I cried.  It was as though I was losing another part of my husband, who worked for NASA for 45 years.

The grieving cycle fascinates me.  I’ve studied it for years and tried to understand the process.  During this past year, I’ve found myself marveling at my reaction to my own grieving.  I cry at the most unexpected times and for the most fascinating reasons.  On Resurrection Day, I cried because I realized that this would be my husband’s first time to celebrate this day in heaven.

Later in the day, I cried because I no longer have to be worried about him.  For seven years, each time I left the house, I prepared myself to find him dead when I came home.  This was a sub-conscious reaction but it was extremely real.  On our anniversary, earlier this year, I cried because I was so angry that he died a few months before our 50th anniversary.  Silly, of course.  But a reality.

During the years my husband was ill, I continued to work.  For five years, I did a daily blog.  Even during the 9 months that he was dying, I continued the grind.  Since Christmas of 2011, I have not been able to keep up the schedule of blogging each day.

For about a month, I fretted about my failure to do the work that I’d committed myself to do.  A couple of weeks ago, I realized that this is probably another result of my grieving.  During Frank’s sickness, I continued to continue.  Now, physical tiredness has caught up with me.  I am simply tired.

“I wonder how I was Frank’s full-time caregiver and I still worked full-time,” I said to a partner in ministry a couple of weeks ago.  “I can’t get my work done; and I don’t have the extra stress of taking care of my husband.”  Verbalizing my inability to do the work helped me to pick up the issue, hold it to the light and examine it in a realistic way.

I’m swimming through another grieving level.  This one is physical exhaustion.  Each evening, I feel like collapsing rather picking up another project or turning on the computer to write.

There are times we are simply tired.  Your reason may not be grief but some other concern.  Perhaps this is God’s cue to you that it’s time for you to trim back and rest.

This an excellent review of the current movie rage, HUNGER GAMES. I’ve read the books and seen the movie. Bryan Daniels gives a good overview and helps us see the redemptive value of the books and movie. Most of your members will probably see this film.  Thanks, Bryan.

Chief of the least

I went on a field trip this last Friday.

The high school I teach at took a group of 150 ninth graders to a viewing of “The Hunger Games” at a local theater. The trip was paid out of pocket by students and not by taxpayer money I assure you. With the exception of two other math teachers in attendance, I was probably the only soul in the theater who had never read the book. I can’t comment on the literary validity of the book series (I don’t read much fiction) but I thought I’d share a few thoughts about the movie with my beloved readership.

The “Hunger Games”  film is becoming a record-setting blockbuster ($70 million in its opening DAY) and is a surefire successful Trilogy; As conscientious Christians who want Christ’s kingdom to permeate all levels of culture, it is good to at least be semi-informed about what popular culture obsesses over and values:

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